Rum lovers around the world owe a great debt to a simple plant: sugar cane. Hundreds of years ago, there was a sugar craze in Europe, and colonies were established around the Caribbean to make the sweet commodity. But the production of sugar creates a lot of byproduct—namely, molasses. There wasn’t much use for the thick, sticky, sweet substance until it was discovered that molasses could be fermented and then distilled. The alcohol quickly became popular with pirates, sailors and America’s founders.

Poster Video
How to make a

Did You Know That Booze Can Be Made From Honey?

No need to save the honey for your English muffins and tea. This bee-friendly booze is the next buzzy thing.

How to Make the Ultimate Daiquiri

Three simple ingredients put together with a little care create a kind of cocktail magic.

Three Extremely Useful Tricks I Learned From Writing a Cocktail Book

The co-writer of Julie Reiner’s new book, The Craft Cocktail Party, came out the other side with even more cocktail know-how than when she started.

There’s a Rum Revolution Happening In the South Right Now

The storied rum-making traditions of the Southern U.S. are back, thanks to a range of enterprising distillers.

More Articles